About Ballina

About Ballina

Are you looking for Ballina Accommodation? Ballina is at the mouth of the Richmond River, among white, sandy beaches and shimmering rivers, lakes and waterways, the island town of Ballina is the commercial and cultural heart of the Shire.

It’s a unique blend of tranquil country hideaway and vibrant seaside resort, where holiday-makers of all ages and from all walks of life are welcomed by an equally diverse local community.

The streets of downtown Ballina are lined with stylish cafes and restaurants, classic country pubs and modern clubs that offer first class dining and entertainment. There are pools, parks and entertainment centres offering loads of fun for the kids, and you can visit museums, galleries, expos and festivals bursting with the vibrant works of local craftspeople. There are antique and curio shops and, for the dedicated shopaholic, a mind-boggling choice of boutiques and designer stores.

The coastline is a beach lovers dream with sheltered coves, vast ocean beaches and some of the world’s finest surf breaks. The beach fishing is legendary and if you wet a line from the North or South Wall, you’ll be in for a reel treat!!

Population:

Approximately 20,000.

Main Industries:

Tourism, fishing, sugar cane, macadamia nuts.

Average Temperature:

Summer 28 degrees C (82 degrees F).

Winter 21 degrees C (70 degrees F).

Coastline:

32 kilometres (20 miles) in Ballina Shire.

Rainfall:

About 1200/1500 mm a year (50/60 inches).

Location

Ballina is located on the Pacific Highway, and was established on the northern shore of the Richmond River near Cape Byron, Australia’s most easterly point, in the 1840s. Ballina boasts some of the most beautiful surfing beaches and picturesque headlands on the east coast of Australia, such as Angel’s Beach. It is approximately 750 km (466 mi) north of Sydney and 205 km (127 mi) south of Brisbane. It is home to the World’s Largest Prawn (made of concrete and fibreglass).

Ballina is situated on the mouth of the Richmond River, which was an important transport route for the region for the first 100 years after settlement. The river and its estuaries abound with marine wildlife and are used for recreational fishing and water sports.

History

Ballina has a number of famous “landfalls” associated with it. In 1928, Charles Kingsford Smith’s plane, the “Southern Cross”, crossed the coast over Ballina after its epic journey across the Pacific. Ballina had a festival associated with the event during the 1970s and 1980s, and a school in East Ballina bears the name “Southern Cross”.

In 1973, the Las Balsas rafts were towed into Ballina by fishing trawlers after their journey from Ecuador.  They had planned to arrive in Mooloolaba in Queensland, but currents forced them off their course. Their journey was almost twice as long as the Kon-Tiki expeditions of 1947 and proved that people could have travelled across the Pacific in ancient times.

A branch railway line connected Ballina with the Casino-Murwillumbah Railway at Booyong. The line was opened on 24 August 1930 and closed on 12 January 1949.